Tuesday, 27 June 2017

Nailing Jess by Triona Scully - Blog Tour




Welcome to my stop on the Blog Tour for Nailing Jess by Triona Scully, her debut novel. Welcome Triona and thanks so much for taking the time to do a wee Q&A with me. Guys you can read my review for Nailing Jess by clicking HERE.


Before we get into it, if you haven't already seen it, this is the cover for Nailing Jess. I am not normally one to comment on covers but it does strike you doesn't it? If I was walking by it in a bookshop I would absolutely be drawn to pick this up!






1. What was the idea behind the book?

- Nailing Jess is a perfectly functional serial killer novel. It is also a satire on perfectly functional serial killer novels, and the raw deal women often get in this genre. Rather than victimised, women are the perpetrators of sexual and violent crime. The results ain’t pretty, but at least they are, in the main, still alive.


2. Feminism is a huge theme in the book what made you want to go this route?

I’m a feminist Lainy, so it seemed like the obvious route. I OD’d on feminist writers after a gruesome break up, a long time ago. On the one hand, it’s was a powerful thing to do, providing me with the language and science to explain what all women instinctively know – they get a raw deal. On the other hand, it was mind-blowingly dis-empowering ‘coz I came out the other side, with all this knowledge that I can’t unlearn, and the world remains indifferent. Everything I write these days is from a feminist perspective, because it is what I now know.


3. There is swearing galore, you chose “suck” and “sucking” in place of “f*ck” why?

F*** is a male verb, for a male act. At the core of heterosexual mating rituals, men are the active participant, women the passive receiver. Suck is the verb we might use, if women defined the sex act, as something they initiated.


4. I found that really hard to read because I am so familiar with the F word in those exchanges, do you think it was a bold move changing it up like that?

I don’t know if I thought it was bold, but I was certain in had to be done. As a society, we wantonly use the word ‘F***’ to define some of our most intimate actions and some of our most violent ones. The same word - to say ‘I love you’ and ‘I want to cause you harm’. That’s f***ed!


5. Even the mention of Hansel and Gretel the names where changed for the female listing first, what made you do that?

Because that’s how inequality is created and maintained. Through the little things like men (Hansel) always being put first. And the big things, like domestic homicide being downplayed to a ‘family tragedy’, in terms of how the media portray it, and how the courts sanction it, and ultimately, how society perceives it.


6. I picked up the book expecting the crimes to be the main focus, reading the book the strong female theme was, for me, the main focus. Even the males wardrobe choices are very different! Was this your intent/goal?

It was fifty-fifty. Having a core story to tell, with a start, middle, end, and a shedload of bodies was really important to me. I’m a huge crime fan, and I’ve always wanted to write a crime novel. I’m intrigued how thrillers like ‘Gone Girl’ are perceived as feminist, because whilst that book undoubtedly has a strong female lead, it also perpetrates many tired, old stereotypes about how untrustworthy and unhinged women are. I wanted my crime novel to be unambiguously feminist.


7. The main character is different from any I have read, even her name, what was your vision when you created her?

Absolutely! I wanted to create a woman, like no other. I wanted the reader to focus on what she says and what she does, not how she looks, and I think I’ve achieved that with Wayne.


8. With all the swearing, sexism and questionable behaviour from our DCI and overall theme I think this will be a marmite book. How do you feel about your debut being a marmite read?

It’s impossible to describe how surreal it is, to put something out there, and then read reactions to it. I have had to very quickly come to terms with the fact that my work is done, give or take the never-ending marketing drive. There is nothing I can do or say to alter how people perceive the Nailing Jess. Do I want everyone to love it? Absolutely. Is that likely to happen? It would appear not. So, I will settle for the next best thing. As many people as possible to love it.


9. I think this would make for a great reading group book as there is so much to debate/discuss. Which aspect of the book would you like to see most argued over?

I would feel so honoured to have any people debate any of the number of issues it raises from misogyny and violent crime, to drug use, to the lot of single mothers, to everyday sexism.


10. What is next for Triona Scully?

I could tell you, but I’d have to kill you! I never talk about unfinished work. I’ve written a play called ‘The Contact Killer’ and I’m looking to produce it in the next year. So, if you know any wealthy art enthusiasts…


And if we aren't spoiling you enough with a Q&A I am also offering up my copy as a giveaway, UK only this time guys sorry. Please keep in mind this is an ARC so any errors (I can't say I noticed any) are because this was an advanced copy. To be in with a chance just enter by using the Rafflecopter below. Open until the end of the month. You can buy your own copy now and the e book is only 99p at time of posting.





a Rafflecopter giveaway

3 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. Great interview. This book sounds very original as well as entertaining.

    I tend to really like books about issues such as this.

    I agree that the cover is striking.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh sounds like an interesting book. I also like how some of the little things were changed up and knowing why. Great interview!

    ReplyDelete

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